DEVELOPMENT / 2008-02-17

About the Blender Typeface

Blending in linguistics means mixing parts, also called morphemes, the smallest meaningful units in terms of form and content. The smallest units in the ‘Blender’ font are defined segments resulting from blending two fonts. Segments were cut from these generated hybrid forms and were re-assembled, recombined as new characters over its underlying strict construction grid. The font follows a rational principle but retains a reticently soft look with its formal conditions.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

fig.a


 

The starting point for finding the new form. A simple grid font, a predecessor of the later 'FRAC' font (based on a early CAD type) and the ‘Regular’ font defined in its basic features by Norm (Dimitri Bruni, Manuel Krebs) are synthesized.

 

 

 

Regular

FRAC

Blender Plain

fig-a
fig-a2

regular-lineRegular
regular-lineFRAC
regular-lineBlender

 

 


 

 

 

fig.b


 

The smallest units in the ‘Blender’ font are generated by blending two character elements. The character of the font is developed by a series of examinations of graphically simplified forms blended together in different gradations. The individual module units are cut from these.

 

 

fig-b

 

 

 

fig.c


 

The building blocks created by the blending investigations were placed in a library and then recombined as new characters via a grid system.

 

 

fig-b

 

 

 

 

fig.d


 

The combined segments are unified and blended together. The characters’ stem thickness, overlaps in the x height and the base line are corrected visually for the round characters, the widths and metrics are adjusted.

 

 

fig-b

 

 

 

fig.e


 

The slanting stems are a subtle device for making the geometrical spaces between the letters look softer. The open angle of the downswings makes the characters lighter. One idea that was important to me at the development stage was the apparent ‘swing’ this creates from one character to the next. Something that may function in certain combinations shows its weakness through the severity of the construction, above all in the case of the small ‘r’.

 

 

fig-b

 

 

 

 

 

fig.f


 

The systematics principle produces identical metrics. Ascenders and descenders correspond to half a character minus the bar width. This relates only to the plain cut, which forms the basis for the whole font family.

 

 

 

fig-b

 

 

 

 

fig.g


 

The font weights are generated technically via increasing and decreasing stroke width and cleaned up subsequently.

 

 

fig-b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blender-font designed by Nik Thoenen in 2003,
find its last revision in 2008 to include Cyrillic and Greek.

Blender in BL-Typewriter
Blender Webfont
Blender Pro Glyph Set